Bureaux de Twitter à Cambridge | Glassdoor

Cambridge, MA (États-Unis) de Twitter

Avis - Twitter à Cambridge, MA (États-Unis)

  • Utile (1)

    « Like no place I've ever worked for »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Employé actuel - Senior Software Engineer - Cambridge, MA (États-Unis)
    Employé actuel - Senior Software Engineer - Cambridge, MA (États-Unis)
    Recommande
    Perspective positive
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    Je travaille chez Twitter à plein temps (Moins d'un an)

    Avantages

    I could go on for a while about why Twitter is a great to work, I feel as though all of my friends are sick of hearing me talk about it. The pay is great, the perks are great, the tech and people are great and the food is amazing. :-) It's just great.

    Inconvénients

    Large company. Offices are usually in the city so if you live outside the city get ready for the commute.

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Offres d'emploi chez Twitter à Cambridge, MA (États-Unis)

salaires Twitter Cambridge, MA (États-Unis)

Salaires en $ (USD)
Moyenne
Min.
Max.
97 859 $ par an
96k $
117k $
97 859 $ par an
96k $
117k $
122 291 $ par an
142 $
157k $
122 291 $ par an
142 $
157k $
175 768 $ par an
152k $
192k $
175 768 $ par an
152k $
192k $

Entretiens - Twitter à Cambridge, MA (États-Unis)

Expérience

Expérience
42%
29%
29%

Obtenir un entretien

Obtenir un entretien
57%
29%
14%

Difficulté

2,8
Moyenne

Difficulté

Difficile
Moyenne
Facile
  1. Utile (1)  

    Entretien de Senior Product Marketing Manager

    Candidat à l'entretien anonyme - Cambridge, MA (États-Unis)
    Aucune offre d'embauche
    Expérience négative
    Difficulté moyenne

    Candidature

    J'ai postulé en ligne. Le processus a pris +6 mois. J'ai passé un entretien à Twitter (Cambridge, MA (États-Unis)) en août 2016.

    Entretien

    I would describe Twitter's interview process as overly methodical which leads me to wonder what it would actually be like working there. I did not hear from a recruiter for four months after submitting my application online. At that point I had a fairly straightforward phone screen with a GM of the unit I was applying for. Afterwards, it was indicated that there was mutual interest and that I would set up time to meet the team in person. It took another month plus to get on the schedule to meet in person.

    This is where things got weird. I was interviewed in three groups of two people each, always a male/female pair. In each of these pairs the female would sit farther away and the male would dominate the conversation. It seemed more like this was being done to trot out diversity (women in technology) than to add value. The interview was a grand inquisition instead of a conversation as other interviews usually are.

    The first pair was assigned to have me top grade my jobs since I entered the workforce nearly a decade ago, I had to provide feedback on what I was hired for, how my responsibilities changed, what went well, what didn't and then what score 1-10 my manager would assign me (to which I was told they would be calling).

    The next set focused on strategy, again what went well, what didn't. The final set focused on execution, again what went well what didn't. None of the interviewers really left time to adequately ask questions and many times my answers were not detailed enough for them despite spelling out exact examples. e.g,) "How did you collect customer feedback? A: "We ran a quarterly survey for which I would follow-up via email and telephone with participants. I would ask them xyz and summarize the feedback..." Follow-up Q: "But how did you collect customer feedback?" Overall the process seemed quite bizarre to me.

    The next day my recruiter emailed asking to speak about my interview. The email I received had an optimistic tone, but the phone call was to inform me that they had passed on my candidacy. I appreciate the phone call, but a simple email would have done at this point. I'm sure there are a lot of smart people at Twitter and there are great opportunities there, but ultimately it was not a fit for me. I was disappointed not to receive an offer but realize I would not have taken it anyway.

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