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Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni) de Meraki

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Avis - Meraki à Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni)

  • Utile (1)

    « A fantastic place to work. »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Employé actuel - Territory Account Manager - Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni)
    Employé actuel - Territory Account Manager - Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni)
    Recommande
    Perspective positive
    Approuve le PDG

    Je travaille chez Meraki à plein temps (Moins d'un an)

    Avantages

    I have been at Meraki for just over 6 months now. In that time I have been more and more impressed by the companies success and ethos.
    It goes without saying that working for one of Cisco's largest and fastest growing components is both exciting and rewarding, however, it is in Meraki's values and environment that the business excels.
    Whilst yes, we as Territory Account Manager's carry a demanding sales quota we are encouraged to think about 'how' we get to that number and if we are looking after ourselves and each other whilst striving for those goals. Examples of this include; quarterly team events, charity days, unconscious bias training, mental well-being workshops and aspiring leadership events.
    This helps to build an environment that breeds success for those who work here both inside and outside the office.

    Apart from working for a disruptive and market leading technology business, other bonuses include, a fantastic catered lunch every day, a generous share scheme, uncapped commissions and 2x yearly trips to the US.
    Development and career building in Meraki, Cisco, or another of Cisco's Partners is also pretty limitless.

    Inconvénients

    The only downside I can think of is that working from home is not an option in my particular role. This does not concern me but might be important to others.

    The intentions behind this are good, as mentioned above, its more difficult to build a cohesive team if everyone's sat at home!

    Conseils à la direction

    Keep doing what you're doing!

Voir les avis

Photos chez Meraki à Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni)

Meraki photo de : Cisco Meraki London Holiday Party 2018
Meraki photo de : Cisco Meraki London Holiday Party 2018
Meraki photo de : Cisco Meraki London Holiday Party 2018
Meraki photo de : Cisco Meraki London Holiday Party 2018
Meraki photo de : Cisco Meraki London Holiday Party 2018
Meraki photo de : Cisco Meraki London Holiday Party 2018

Offres d'emploi chez Meraki à Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni)

salaires Meraki Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni)

Salaires en £ (GBP)
Moyenne
Min.
Max.
36 679 £ par an
28k £
46k £
36 679 £ par an
28k £
46k £
40 855 £ par an
32k £
60k £
40 855 £ par an
32k £
60k £
45 878 £ par an
38k £
51k £
45 878 £ par an
38k £
51k £

Entretiens - Meraki à Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni)

Expérience

Expérience
53%
14%
33%

Obtenir un entretien

Obtenir un entretien
49%
24%
10%
5
5
5
2

Difficulté

3,1
Moyenne

Difficulté

Difficile
Moyenne
Facile
  1. Utile (6)  

    Entretien de Network Support Engineer

    Candidat à l'entretien anonyme - Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni)
    Aucune offre d'embauche
    Expérience négative
    Difficulté moyenne

    Candidature

    J'ai postulé en ligne. Le processus a pris 3 semaines. J'ai passé un entretien à Meraki (Londres, Angleterre (Royaume-Uni)) en juillet 2021.

    Entretien

    I first applied for the role. Then the HR person emailed me saying she would like to do an initial assessment with me, so I had to book time. When she did call, she asked questions like how much I knew about the company and why I wanted to work for Cisco Meraki. Then she went on to ask basic networking questions like describing STP, what it's for ? And explaining VLANs. And to describe how devices get an IP address, whether if it's statically configured or dynamically via DHCP, then explain the entirety of the DHCP process.
    Another question she asked was about Address Resolution Protocol (ARP), the entire process from which the hosts communicates with another host on the same network; if the IP address of the recipient is not on the ARP table of the host, then how it sends an ARP query frame as broadcast and how the other host responds to it. So the source host gets the IP address.

    After that interview, sometime later, I got an email from her, telling me that I was successful to progress to the next stage via WebEx. This was more difficult though, but could be aced if you understand CCNA. The first question, was a very basic STP question, with 3 switches, was asked which one becomes the root bridge, and which port gets blocked, determined by Bridge ID.
    The following question, she draws a topology, of a switch with 2 hosts connected to it, each being on a separate VLAN, and that switch is connected to a router. First question is, how do the two hosts communicate ? It's a router-on-stick question, And if they cannot communicate, then what steps would you take to ensure they are able to communicate ? Ensure the hosts have an IP address (statistically or dynamically). Then ensure the switch ports (connected to hosts) are on Access mode, with their allowed VLAN configured. Then ensure the default gateway of each VLAN on the switch is set to subinterfaces(s) of the router's interface. Next step would be, to ensure the switch port connecting to the router is configured as a trunk, that allows the 2 VLANs to travel over. Make sure the native VLAN of that trunk does not clash with one of the VLANs. Then on the router. Look at the physical interface which is connected to the switch port. Ensure that port is administratively & operationally up/up. Ensure it has an IP address. Then check if it has subinterfaces, and ensure each sub interface is encapsulated with dot1q with the VLAN with an IP address acting as the default gateway for each of the VLANs (specified on the switch). By this point, the troubleshooting for this Router-On-Stick should be done, unless I missed a step.
    Another question, was, to go through the process of a frame travelling from one host to another, what changes along the way, we know the IP address of source & destination remains the same, but the source/destination of the MAC addresses changes after each point, from the host to the router, then from the router to the destination host.
    Next part is, a DHCP server is added onto the topology, and a new host. And the new host is set to dynamically get it's IP address from this DHCP server. Explain the entirety of the DORA process. Then you're told that the DHCP pool consists of IP Addresses of a particular range, and the IP address of the new host is not of that range, therefore the IP address must have been got from a rogue DHCP server. How would you go about this issue ? This part I could not do.
    There was a question on how the switch populates it's CAM table (MAC Address table), which is when a frame enters a switch via a port, the switch looks at the frames' source address and attaches that MAC address to that ingress port. The binding between the Mad Address & port is 300 seconds by default (5 minutes).
    Sorry if I missed a question from this, interview.

    After this interview, I had an email from the same HR lady, telling me I passed the interview. And that I had to sit a third one. When the time came for me to sit this one, I ended up failing it.
    There are 2 main topologies, one with wireless, the other with VPN.
    The wireless one is, when 2 AP's are connected to a switch, and that switch is connected to another switch, which is connected to a DHCP server. Each of the AP's are in separate locations (maybe different rooms). In each location, there exists a host, both cannot connect to their AP's. How would we go around this issue for each of them to connect to the AP. And after that, how would we go about troubleshooting issues for each of the devices to get an IP address ? I'd make sure hosts are connected to correct SSID and passwords are same. If the devices are connected to the AP's by then. Then configure the hosts to dynamically get the IP addresses from the DHCP server. Then make sure the switch ports connecting the two switches are configured as trunks with their allowed VLANs being able to transverse through the link, and removing inconsistencies regarding the native VLANs.

    Questions d'entretien d'embauche

    • I written above in the Describe Interview Process part. But run out of space.
      The second question of the third stage of the interview, being based on VPN. This one was tricky. You are shown a topology of two sites connected through the internet. And a VPN is created from a router of one site, connected to a VPN Gateway of another site (but this is connected to the switch, not on router). You are told to troubleshoot this. This is where I got confused. I just made sure the IKE1 was set up correctly, the ISAKMP SA's were all matching, and then the pre-shared key matched. Then the IPSec SA's were the same. Then attached it to the VPN tunnel. Also, ensured the tunnel interface was configured correctly, where the destination of the tunnel was the public facing address of the other end, and the tunnel source was a loopback address, and ensured both ends of the tunnel interface were on the same subnet. Then made sure there was a static route (on each site) stating to get to that other site, the next hop would be the tunnel interface IP address. And so on. I got a little confused here. I think this is why I failed.

      Overall the interview was rigorous and it being 5 steps is over the top in my opinion. I failed on the third. Those that are applying, re-read your CCNA's thoroughly and make sure you understand most the concepts, except for OSPF, as I'm surprised they didn't ask me any of that, or even ACL.   Répondre à cette question
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